Internet Chess club on Facebook Internet Chess club on Twitter Internet Chess club on Google+ Internet Chess club on YouTube Internet Chess club on LinkedIn Subscribe to Internet Chess Club RSS feed

 

        "Welcome to ICC’s super video collection! Scroll down to discover over 3,000 hours of video instruction at your fingertips! Sign up and unlock all premium and bonus videos!"  -GM Joel Benjamin

 

 

GM Joel's Chess Week Recap

August 19, 2019 
 
    

Three-time U.S. Champion GM Joel Benjamin brings you a new show every Monday at 18:00 Server Time. Joel is regarded by many as one of the best commentators and analysts we have in the game today -- so if you want to get ahead of the game, get ready to tune in!

Magnus Carlsen had a bad experience at the 4th leg of the Grand Chess tour in St. Louis, playing Rapid and Blitz. The World Champion found himself in deep and agitated waters when his play didn't allow him to show the usual superiority. The Russian Championship is missing the best players, such as Nepomniachtchi, Svidler, Grischuk, Karjakin and, of course, the now-retired Kramnik. So it's a mix of veteran second-tier stars like Tomashevsky, Vitiugov, and Jakovenko, and up and coming players like Sarana, Predke, and Alekseenko. A lot of eyes are on Vlad Artemiev, who has risen meteorically this year. After a good start, he lost three in a row and found himself near the bottom of the field. GM Joel shows us some of the most interesting games form these two events. 

 

   

GM Yermolinsky's "Every Russian Schoolboy Knows"

August 18, 2019 
 
    

Former World Champion and legendary chess teacher Mikhail Botvinnik was the originator of the “Every Russian schoolboy knows” chess aphorism, which alluded to the fact that thousands of unknown schoolboys back in Russia - due to the intense training methods they received from a young age - likely knew more about the game than most professionals did in the West. 

One player who came through that legendary Soviet training camp is former U.S. Champion GM Alexander Yermolinsky.  And each Sunday in his hit show, “Every Russian Schoolboy Knows”, Alex will explain and expand on all the top tips and tricks gleaned from those famed training methods. 

Today's show is: Players Profile: Richard Rapport Part 2

In September 2016, then at the age of 20, Hungarian GM Richard Rapport rose up to the impressive 2752 mark in the rating list. His game was mainly noted for its original approach to the opening. Richard routinely opened his games with 1.b3, alongside with other unorthodox openings. In some ways, he was perceived as the Hungarian Jobava, another player possessing an unusual style, which wouldn't stand against the scrutiny of top-flight competition. The expected fall from grace didn't take long. By the end of the same year, Rapport's rating plunged 50 points, and that was then I met Richard for the first time at the Hainan Danzhou International Open in China. I was immediately taken by Richard's friendly manner and refined European upbringing. While Rapport's struggles continued in Danzhou, I was, nonetheless convinced that eventually he would right the ship. What I saw was a player with a wide range of skills, equally suited for attack and defense, complimented with an excellent endgame technique. Three years later, in 2019, we can see the emergence of a new Rapport, a complete player who is ready to take on the World's elite. His rating is almost back where it once was, now at 2747, earned through a series of solid tournament performances in Wijk aan Zee, where Richard came back from -2 to finish at a respectable 50%, another 50% score at the Dute Cup, followed by a tournament win in the Danzhou GM event. July saw Rapport scoring +1 in Dortmund, and then he took off for his favorite destination again to play in the Chinese Team Championship. This video series showcases Rapport's multiple talents. It starts off with a crushing attack against Tsydypov, an upset win over Magnus Carlsen, which was achieved in the middle game, and a nice rook endgame win against Riazantsev. Video 2 is centered around a great win over Wei Yi, once again highlighting great technical work in the endgame. Yet, in contrast, there's a swashbuckling attack in the blitz game against Le Quang Liem. The concluding video of this three-part series, illustrates the morphing of Richard's style into something almost Carlsenesque, particularly visible in his win over Nepo. Enjoy the games, and expect to see Richard Rapport reaching new heights any time soon.

 

   

GM Larry Christiansen's "Attack with LarryC!"

August 17, 2019 
 

 

    

GM Larry Christiansen is a three-time U.S. Champion and one of the most dangerous and respected attacking players of his generation. He is a feared competitor and attacker who authored two popular books that showcase his aggressive style: Storming the Barricades and Rocking the Ramparts. Each week on the show, Larry will feature various attacking motifs and themes and showing you how best to play for mate.

Today's show is: Makinas' Gold
 

It is finally Spring but, as Larry says at the beginning of the show, it's snowing where he lives! So, waiting for nice weather, Larry presents us two entertaining combos as a starter and then moves on with the main course, that is a game played at the European Individual Women Championship in 2013 between Carmen Voicu-Jagodzinsky and Nino Batsiashvili.

 

   

 

Learn How to Win with GM Boris

  August 15, 2019 
 
    

Nowadays, everyone is super prepped up in openings, you might be too, and you're likely getting good positions out of them, but it's in the middle game where battles are decided. In this magnificent video series, GM Alterman (ELO 2611) carefully takes you through all the key aspects and secrets of middlegame play.

Space Advantage - Part 4

In this new series, GM Boris Alterman focuses his attention on a very important concept in chess: space advantage.
A space advantage simply refers to the possession of more squares than your opponent. Other things being equal, the side that controls more space on the board has an advantage. More space means more options, which can be exploited both tactically and strategically. The easiest way to gain space is to push the pawn skeleton forward. Capablanca said: If you have an advantage in space avoid exchanges, which can lead to exemption of the play. When you have an advantage in space your opponent’s figures choke of the lack of space and fetter in maneuvers. That is the reason why you should avoid exchanges in such a situation. Every exchange should be motivated; it means it should bring some positional or tactical dividends. When you have a lack of space, try to exchange pieces to give your forces more room for maneuvering.
Be careful not to over-stretch your pawns structure, though! If the opponent succeeds in getting a protected square behind enemy lines, this strong outpost can become a serious problem for you.
When you have a space advantage you can move pieces fast from one flank to another to create weaknesses. Opponent's pieces which have limited space hardly could be transferred back fast enough to defend a new weakness.
Don't miss this new and instructive series of GM Alterman's weekly show "Learn How to Win with GM Boris!"

 

   

 

NM Dan Heisman's "Improve Your Chess IV"

April 16, 2019
 
   

National Master Dan Heisman is a name that is synonymous with excellence in chess coaching and teaching. Dan authors the award-winning Novice Nook column (winner of three Chess Journalists of America "Best Instruction" awards), aimed at improving adults, for chesscafe.com that are clearly written and offer very practical advice and tips on how to improve your game. More info about Dan can be found here.

Amateur Mistakes: What are ALL the things that move does? #2

NEW VIDEO SERIES!

Coach Dan Heisman is back to help average players step up and raise their level of play. In this new series, Dan shows us the most common mistakes that, typically, an amateur makes during a chess game. Time management, wrong openings, outright blunders, and many more mistakes that can plague a chess game are tackled by Coach Heisman, with suggestions on how to avoid them. While the series is aimed at amateur players, Dan's advice can be useful for every chess player! 

Today's show: This video shows two games with the same errors in each game: asking "Why did he make that move?" instead of "What are ALL the things that move does?". Also features some sneaky pins

 

 

   

 

Tricks and Traps in the Opening - with IM Watson

July 27, 2018 
 
    

Tricks 'n Traps in the Opening
How many tricks and traps are there in the sea of opening theory? From the simplest ones to the more advanced, IM John Watson in this amazing video series shows you how to fool (or not be fooled by!) your opponent, who might not know the intricacies of an opening.
The course is organized by general opening, and in 15 videos our opening guru IM John Watson provides you with tools that will make your opponents exclam "How did this happen?".
This series is aimed at everyone, from the club player to the master. 
John shows, statistics at hand, that even simple tricks and traps have caught out of guard FMs, IMs and GMs, some of which rather famous! 
By watching this video series, you'll sharpen your tactical sense, 
understand better your favorite opening, and broaden your general knowledge about openings.
Tricks and traps are everywhere: IM Watson shows how once you've learned how a trap works, it can apply not only to the opening phase of the game but also in the middlegame and even in the endgame!
In other words, learn how to use your tricks in the opening, and you'll become a better player all-around.

English Opening

 

   

 

 

GM Ronen Har-Zvi's Opening Series

March 30, 2018 

    

With this series, GM Ronen guides us through the secrets of the Alapin Sicilian

The Alapin Sicilian - Part 6

For many players not having the time or inclination studying the never-ending labyrinth of mainline Sicilians, such as the Najdorf, Dragon, Taimanov and Sveshnikov, the Alapin with 1. e4 c5 2. c3 has proved to be a very popular alternative. It is named after the Russian master Semyon Alapin (1856-1923), and today it is one of the most solid and respected Anti-Sicilians, championed by many club players and leading grandmasters, such as Evgeny Sveshnikov, Eduardas Rozentalis and Sergey Tiviakov.